Psychiatry Boards and PRITE Study Tips

Finding time to study as a resident can be a challenge. The best advice is to really think about your cases, talk about them to supervisors and then read voraciously about them. If your patient has treatment refractory schizophrenia, examine all of the medications used to treat it. Making charts and flashcards for the more mundane information like drug-drug interactions or the rare neurological diseases can be of help. Reading the APA Practice Guidelines or a main textbook like APA or Kaplan and Sadock is essential. After reading the major materials from a comprehensive text, it is a good idea to review using a quick reference guide like the Mass General Board Review, Secrets of Psychiatry or Stahl’s Prescriber’s guide. Another great resources is the APA’s psychiatryonline, which has become one of my favorite resources.

Between patients, I will pull up the DSM criteria and read through it to refresh. You can access all of the main textbooks like Dulcan’s Child Psychiatry, the APA book on Geriatriac Psychiatry, The APA Substance Abuse book, The APA book of Psychopharmacology, The Manual of Clinical Psychopharamcology, Gabbard’s Treatments of Psychiatric Disorders and the Textbook of Psychotherapeutic Treatments. Other resources on psychiatryonline include the major journals like the American Journal of Psychiatry, Focus as well as Psychiatric News. One of my favorite sections of psychiatryonline is the DSM-IV Casebook, which are expert written and reviewed cases detailing differential diagnosis. There even is some basic self-assessment software, but the questions are static and do not give any comprehensive feedback on strengths and weaknesses. The BoardVitals psychiatry question bank provides an online, interactive database of questions with extensive explanations (including images and tables/charts) and statistics/feedback to track your progress.

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